Shells and bytes: mollusks in the 16-bit era

Daniel C. Cavallari Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo; São Paulo, Brazil. Email: dccavallari (at) gmail (dot) com Download PDF Mollusks are one of the most diverse groups of organisms known to science. Humanity has described more than 80,000 species of snails and slugs (gastropods), clams, oysters and scallops (bivalves), squids and octopuses (cephalopods), tusk shellsContinue reading “Shells and bytes: mollusks in the 16-bit era”

The birds of James Bond

Rodrigo B. Salvador1 & Barbara M. Tomotani2 1 Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart; Stuttgart, Germany. Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen; Tübingen, Germany. Email: salvador.rodrigo.b (at) gmail (dot) com 2 Netherlands Institute of Ecology; Wageningen, The Netherlands. Rijksuniversiteit Groningen; Groningen, The Netherlands. Email: babi.mt (at) gmail (dot) com Download PDF “The name is Bond, James Bond.” This particular BritishContinue reading “The birds of James Bond”

Geeky nature

Rodrigo B. Salvador Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart; Stuttgart, Germany. Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen; Tübingen, Germany. Email: salvador.rodrigo.b (at) gmail (dot) com Download PDF Everybody knows that each species on the planet eventually receives a so-called “scientific name”, a two-piece Latin-like name that serves the purpose of scaring people away from science – even more thanContinue reading “Geeky nature”

Robins, robins, robins

Barbara M. Tomotani Netherlands Institute of Ecology; Wageningen, The Netherlands. Rijksuniversiteit Groningen; Groningen, The Netherlands. Email: babi.mt (at) gmail (dot) com Download PDF Since Pokémon is a recurrent topic on this journal, I would like to call your attention to this little fellow: the fletchling. Fletchling (yayakoma, in Japanese), as it appears in official Pokémon artwork. FletchlingContinue reading “Robins, robins, robins”